interior design studio – behind the scenes with 3d renders

That glamorous end result you see in magazines or on social media takes weeks and months of planning and hard work. Hours in front of a computer, hours of research, telephone calls, procurement and the list goes on. So, I thought I’d share with you a couple of behind the scenes, from projects that are either on the go right now, or presentations have happened and the project is underway where we used 3D renders to convey the design intention.

Are 3D renders worth it? Here’s the short answer: if you have trouble visualising the space then 3D renders are worth it.  If you give yourself enough time, and you’re constantly thinking about the space, I believe that anyone, even those of you who claim they don’t have that talent, will eventually see the space as it’s going to be. It’s when you don’t have the luxury of time that 3D renders cut through doubts and alleviate any anxiety you may have been feeling moving forward with the project. It’s also when you’re not the one doing the designing, such as when you’re working with an interior designer, that 3D renders really come into their own.

As I write this post I’m sitting on the stoop of my sisters house in Paddington. Yep, it’s rare but I managed a selfie. It’s been a hectic three weeks of consultations, design work and presentations. I love how fluid the design world is, particularly when it comes to running your own studio. In the last three weeks I’ve been to Forster, Dungbogan, Valla Beach, Port Macquarie, Lake Cathie and now I’m in Paddington on my way to Mittagong. On my way into Sydney I stopped off and met a new supplier in Artarmon who’s first comment was to apologise for the ‘dusty warehouse’ (her words, not mine! I actually thought the warehouse was far from dusty! It was super organised and super neat for a warehouse) and how I must be used to shopping in glamorous boutiques.  This image she had of what an interior designer does made me laugh because what you see in magazines and on social media is literally the end result. Yes, the outcome is glamorous, but the journey there really isn’t glamorous at all.

Visits to sites are dirty and dusty and noisy and sometimes chaotic because as the designer you’re there to ensure the design intention is maintained for the client and that means when you turn up on site trades are looking for clarification and you have to give them the time otherwise the design may end up where it shouldn’t. That glamorous end result takes weeks and months of planning and hard work. Hours in front of a computer, hours of research, telephone calls, procurement and the list goes on. So, I thought I’d share with you a couple of behind the scenes, from projects that are either on the go right now, or presentations have happened and the project is underway. And why 3D renders are becoming a go-to tool for me.

If you watch any architectural or renovation TV shows, or follow interior designers on social media, you’re probably familiar with 3D renders, or perspectives. They convey so easily the design outcomes and design intention that I’ve started to include these as part of my presentation. So, are 3D renders worth it? Here’s the short answer: if you have trouble visualising the space then 3D renders are worth it.  If you give yourself enough time, and you’re constantly thinking about the space, I believe that anyone, even those of you who claim they don’t have that talent, will eventually see the space as it’s going to be. It’s when you don’t have the luxury of time that 3D renders cut through doubts and alleviate any anxiety you may have been feeling moving forward with the project. It’s also when you’re not the one doing the designing, such as when you’re working with an interior designer, that 3D renders really come into their own. 

This exterior design (above) was created because the homeowners couldn’t quite picture some of the ideas we discussed. The design of the interior was easily understandable for them because they’d been doing a lot of thinking about each of the spaces, what they wanted to create and they’d taken some time to understand their design style and aesthetics. Whilst the interior has some stunning architectural details, it was the exterior that really let the overall design down. Resolving the exterior and it’s dishevelled and poor design to complement the interior was required to bring this home to its fullest potential. Bringing all the design ideas together and creating a realistic 3D render was a light bulb moment for the homeowners. The reaction when they were presented with this 3D render was incredible and so worth the investment for them to be fully aware of the changes they were undertaking.

The owners of this kitchen (below) had tried for over 9 months to make a decision on the layout, the finishes, the door profile and pretty much everything else about this space. They’d been going around in circles trying to make a decision and had ended up in a confused mess. Once the design of the space had been resolved, and the finishes, fittings and equipment had been chosen, it was determined that a 3D rendering would bring clarity to the presentation. Using this type of tool gives peace of mind to the homeowners because they can see clearly what the new kitchen is going to look like. It makes moving forward with the project so much easier for them because they already know what the new space will look like.

The owner of this bedroom suite (below), located within the family home in China, wasn’t happy with any of the options she’d been presented with so far. Last year I decorated her apartment here in Australia so I was happy to work with her to get the design she wanted.  Sometimes, it’s best to go right back to basics and pull out the yellow trace and let the creativity flow with the space planning. Understanding natural light, traffic flow through the space and clearances around items are the basics of space planning. We then layer into the design the owners specific preferences, in this case the bed direction, proximity between the bathroom and the sleeping area, the properties setting within the environment. Further development takes into consideration how the owner wants to use each of the spaces and the feeling they want when they’re there. This little sketch looks simple enough, but once you factor in all the requirements and constraints it takes a little bit of creativity to arrive at the right design solution. 

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